Hospitals Stare at Bed Crunch as Kenya Covid-19 Cases Spike

The Kenya Medical Practitioners Pharmacists and Dentists Union (KMPDU) has warned that there are no spaces left within Intensive Care Units (ICUs)

Inside the Mombasa County COVID19 Treatment Centre

Kenya’s COVID-19 positivity rate Tuesday surged to 22.1 per cent after 1,127 more people tested positive in the last 24 hours from a sample size of 5,390.

Consequently, the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Union (KMPDU) raised the red flag over a shortage of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds for Covid-19 patients.

According to the Ministry of Health, 25 patients succumbed to the virus: three were reported in the last 24 hours while 22 were reported on diverse dates. The total number of fatalities is now at 2048. 

210 people have however recovered from COVID-19 pushing the total number of recoveries in the country to 90,586.

Among the 1,090 patients admitted across various facilities in the country;  135 others are in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

“The rising numbers of COVID-19 infections have not spared healthcare workers. 10 doctors are currently admitted to various hospitals yet we are at a point where we need many doctors in the counties,” Acting Secretary General/CEO Chibanzi Mwachonda said during a televised Press conference.

“The acute shortage of doctors is detrimental to health services delivery amid the pandemic,” he added.

Ms Wakarugi, a Kenyan medical doctor on Twitter known as Dr Ginger reiterated the same saying:

 “I work with COVID ICU-HDU in a hospital in Nairobi. We have a bed capacity of 24 and we are filled to capacity. We lose patients daily and as soon as it happens we have callers in line requesting a bed. People are getting more sick and faster now with this so-called third wave. Within 10 days of symptomology, they are rushed to the hospital with oxygen requirements.”

The Ministry, on the other hand, noted that the rising numbers of Covid-19 cases have seen a high demand for oxygen by patients in their facilities. 

“Majority of our County referral hospitals are building their own oxygen generating plants with support from our development partners. The investments in the oxygen generating plants across the country must pay off during this time of high oxygen demand in the facilities.”