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Go Forth: Ubumuntu Arts Festival Returns 14-17 July

The festival aims at creating an avenue where people from different walks of life can come together and speak to each other in the language of Art.

David Indeje is Khusoko’s Digital Editor, covering East African markets.
Ubumuntu Arts Festival is the brainchild of Hope Azeda; a major figure in contemporary Rwandan theatre, and, the founder and Artistic Director of Mashirika Performing Arts and Media Company – a leading theatre company in Rwanda.

Ubumuntu Arts Festival 2019

Africa’s premier performing arts event for social change, The Ubumuntu Arts Festival, returns to its physical stage this year.

Due to the adverse effects of the Coronavirus pandemic, the festival was held virtually for two seasons (2020 and 2021).

This year, the festival will connect local and global audiences through a hybrid of live performances and virtual screenings of specially curated theatre, music and contemporary dance performances and other artistic showcases. 

Now in its seventh year, it is themed; GO FORTH, and it will run from July 14th – 17th at the amphitheatre of the Kigali Genocide Memorial.

Live performances will also be streamed to global audiences on the Ubumuntu Arts Festival Youtube Channel and all social media platforms. 

The festival will feature collaborations by artists from Rwanda, Uganda, Switzerland, Germany, Bosnia, USA, Egypt, Zimbabwe, Belgium, Sri Lanka, Morocco, Belgium, The Netherlands and more. 

Ubumuntu Arts Festival is the brainchild of Hope Azeda; a major figure in contemporary Rwandan theatre, and, the founder and Artistic Director of Mashirika Performing Arts and Media Company – a leading theatre company in Rwanda.

Ubumuntu Arts Festival is the brainchild of Hope Azeda, a significant figure in contemporary Rwandan theatre and the founder and Artistic Director of Mashirika Performing Arts and Media Company – a leading theatre company in Rwanda.

“The beauty of art lies in its ability to deal with the unspeakable. Art can revisit traumatic scenarios and horrific moments in human history on an emotional level that few other methods can accomplish,” Hope Azeda says.

“Our festival confronts global topics without fear, such as police brutality, the refugee crisis, and gender violence. Above all, we encourage communities to fight hatred, dogmatism, and toxic ideas, all behaviours that precede deadly violence. Now, our mission is gradually unfolding into reality.”

The festival was first held in 2015 and is held annually following the last week of the 100 days of commemorating the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi.


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David Indeje is Khusoko’s Digital Editor, covering East African markets.

In my role as Community Engagement Editor For Khusoko, I care about our audience. engaging them, getting news delivered to them across a variety of platforms, and expanding the diversity of voices on our website.

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