Number of footballers suffering from depression DOUBLES during Coronavirus lockdown

The number of footballers reporting symptoms of depression has increased drastically since coronavirus locked down sporting events around the world.

Number of footballers suffering from depression DOUBLES during Coronavirus lockdown

  • Percentage of professional footballers suffering depression has doubled
  • Sporting events have been cancelled or on hold due to the global pandemic

The number of footballers reporting symptoms of depression has increased drastically since coronavirus locked down sporting events around the world.

The study was conducted by FifPro (the worldwide body representing professionals) and Amsterdam University Medical Centers that surveyed 1,602 players across the men’s and women’s games.

It was done in countries where drastic measures were imposed to curb the spread of coronavirus between March 22 and April 14.

The study indicated that 22% of the women and 13% of the men surveyed reported symptoms consistent with depression.

18% of the women and 16% of men reported symptoms consistent with anxiety.

Most sporting events across the globe are on hold or cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic 

The figures in relation to depression are double of those found in a similar study conducted across December and January. The study had indicated that 11% of the women players and 6% of the men reported symptoms akin to depression.

According to FifPro’s Chief Medical Officer Dr. Vincent Goutterbarge:

In football, suddenly young men and women athletes are having to cope with social isolation, a suspension of their working lives and doubts about their future. Some may not be well equipped to confront these changes and we encourage them to seek help from a person they trust or a mental health professional.

England Women’s defender Lucy Bronze also urged those struggling to reach out for support during the lockdown.

Bronze said “If you are having a tough time mentally about your health or your job, speak with a person you trust, or a mental health professional. It’s important not to keep your feelings bottled up. It really helps to share them with someone.”

The survey drew players from countries all across the globe.