Unesco adds reggae music genre to global cultural heritage list

While in its embryonic state Reggae music was the voice of the marginalized, the music is now played and embraced by a wide cross-section of society, including various genders, ethnic and religious groups. – UNESCO

The late Bob Marley, on Thursday, won a spot on the United Nations’ list of global cultural treasures.
Unesco, the world body’s cultural and scientific agency, said reggae music is an“intangible cultural heritage” deemed worthy of protection and promotion.
Reggae music’s “contribution to the international discourse on issues of injustice, resistance, love, and humanity underscores the dynamics of the element as being at once cerebral, socio-political, sensual and spiritual,” Unesco said.
“The basic social functions of the music – as a vehicle for social commentary, a cathartic practice, and a means of praising God – have not changed, and the music continues to act as a voice for all. “

Jamaica applied for reggae’s inclusion on the list this year at a meeting of the UN agency on the island of Mauritius, where 40 proposals were under consideration.
“Reggae is uniquely Jamaican,” said Olivia Grange, the Caribbean island nation’s culture minister, before the vote.
“It is a music that we have created that has penetrated all corners of the world.”